Welcome to the 2017 International Patellofemoral Pain Clinical Symposium
July 22, 2017 | The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Speakers

Our program consists of both established and emerging experts in patellofemoral pain and clinical management.

  • Professor Irene Davis

    Spaulding National Running Centre, Harvard Medical School

    Dr. Davis is the founding director of the Spaulding National Running Center and Professor, Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School.  She received her BS in PT from the Univ. of Florida. and her PhD in Biomechanics from Penn State Univ.  Dr. Davis is a Professor Emeritus in Physical Therapy at the Univ of Delaware where she served on the faculty for over 20 years.  Her research has focused on the relationship between lower extremity mechanics and injury.  Her interests extend to the development of interventions to alter these mechanics through gait retraining.  She is interested in the effect of minimal footwear on both mechanics and injury risk. Dr. Davis has given over 350 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 120 publications. She is a Fellow of the ACSM, the ASB, and a Fellow of the APTA. She was recently named One of the 50 Most Influential People in Running.

  • Professor Chris Powers

    Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California

    Dr. Powers’ research and teaching interests relate to the biomechanical aspects of human movement. More specifically, his research focuses on how altered kinematics, kinetics, and muscular actions contribute to lower extremity injury. He is particularly interested in the pathomechanics underlying knee and patellofemoral joint dysfunction. He is currently the Co-Director of the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics Research Laboratory and the Director of the Program in Biokinesiology at USC.

  • Associate Professor Michael Rathleff

    Research Unit for General Practice, Aalborg University, Denmark

    Michael is an associate professor and clinical researcher with a background in physiotherapy. He is positioned at the Research Unit for General Practice at Aalborg University, where he is the head of the research group for optimizing physical health in youth (the OptiYouth research group). Michael has published more than 70 papers within the field of physiotherapy, sports medicine and primary care research.  His primary research area is adolescent musculoskeletal pain. Michael’s work aims to: 1) understand why some adolescents develop long-lasting musculoskeletal pain; 2) develop effective strategies for managing adolescent musculoskeletal pain; and 3) study the long term impact of adolescent musculoskeletal pain. A special interest is patellofemoral pain which is one of the most common knee conditions among adolescents. Michael works one day a week at Aalborg University Hospital, where he continues to be closely involved in clinical research and knowledge translation.

  • Dr Jason Bonacci

    School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong

    Jason Bonacci is a Lecturer in Biomechanics at Deakin University and practicing physiotherapist at Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre. Jason has Degrees in both Exercise Science and Physiotherapy and obtained his PhD in Biomechanics in 2011 while based in the Physiotherapy Department at the Australian Institute of Sport. His research and clinical interests are in the area of running biomechanics and the management of lower limb overuse injuries. His research on footwear and running biomechanics has been published in highly ranked journals such as the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

  • Dr Jean-Francois Esculier

    University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    Jean-Francois Esculier completed his bachelor of physiotherapy at the University of Ottawa, Canada, before undertaking graduate studies (Masters and PhD) at Laval University, Canada. Over the past few years, he has conducted studies on patellofemoral pain in runners (treatment approaches, biomechanics, footwear), and shows particular interest for clinical research. Jean-Francois is also an active clinician and currently practices as a physiotherapist at the Allan McGavin Sports Medicine Clinic in Vancouver, Canada. He has recently started a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of British Columbia. Given his interest for knowledge translation, Jean-Francois enjoys teaching continuing education courses pertaining to the prevention and treatment of running injuries through The Running Clinic.

  • Mark Matthews

    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland

    Mark Matthews is a Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist with extensive national and international clinical experience in public and private practice, the military and elite sports. A clinical interest in the management of lower limb pathologies, particularly knee pain, lead to a PhD at The University of Queensland. Mark’s research focuses on optimising treatment outcomes in those with PFP, centred around a large multi-centre randomised clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of foot orthoses versus hip exercises, and evaluating the ability of a foot measurement to predict those who will benefit most from foot orthoses. Mark is in the final stages of writing up his PhD and will be presenting findings of the clinical trial at the Symposium.

     

  • Henrik Riel

    Research Unit for General Practice, Aalborg University, Denmark

    Henrik is a physiotherapist who is currently completing his PhD at the Research Unit for General Practice in Aalborg, Denmark. Henrik has worked with adolescents with patellofemoral pain, particularly on methods to improve exercise dose through real-time feedback from an iPad during exercise performance. The focus of his research is on resistance training as treatment for musculoskeletal conditions,  and exercise compliance.

Details

Date: July 22, 2017

Address: The University of Queensland, Brisbane

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